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Cité Europe

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An ideal shopping day out in Calais 150 shops from well known high street names such as Yves Rocher, New Look, H&M, Sephora, Zara and many more. Carrefour hypermarket which offers a large selection of French food & wine, cookware and electrical goods. FREE parking with over 4,000 car spaces (including disabled parking), and a dedicated 50 bay coach parking area Family services: napping changing facilities, kids corner with a game area and little kiddie cars Bowling and billiard complex at Quai 121: a great day out for all the family! Cité Europe loyalty card Apply for your loyalty card and take advantage of special offers across a large selection of brands, from fashion and jewellery to home accessories and food. It's free to apply! Find out more Practical information It only takes 5 minutes to drive to Cite Europe from our Calais terminal Getting there and around Cité Europe 1001 boulevard du Kent 62902 Coquelles Cedex Tel : +33(0)3 21 46 47 48 www.citeeurope.com Book your journey   days local times Shops Monday to Saturday 10:00 to 20:00 Carrefour Monday to Wednesday 09:00 to 21:00   Thursday to Saturday 09:00 to 21:30 Bowling Monday to Thursday 14:00 to 00:00   Friday 14:00 to 02:00   Saturday 11:00 to 02:00   Sunday 11:00 to 00:00 Bars & restaurants Every day from 10:00 to 22:00

Jean-Claude Biguine Salon

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Get your hair styled by an expert French chic, French designers and their international acclaim are often talked about, but now is your opportunity to have your hair re-styled by these hairdressing specialists. There are 260 Biguine hair salons spread over 9 countries and … as luck would have it, there is one near you!

Covent Garden

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Cultural action is world-class At the heart of the Covent Garden piazza lies the famous market, designed in 1632 by Inigo Jones and now visited by 30 million tourists each year. The large glass covered building comprises several arcades of fashionable boutiques, cafés and arts and crafts. In the open piazza jugglers, mime artists, variety acts and musicians delight and amaze the crowds. The Royal Opera House, just off the north piazza, was built in 1809 on the site of a theatre dating back to 1732. A fire destroyed that building in 1857 but it was replaced within a year by the present House which, after two year's renovation, reopened in 2000 to high acclaim. Restaurants, cafés and bars line the piazza, offering great views of this daily spectacle. Useful Infomation Click here to find out what's on and book at the Royal Opera House. For more information How to get there ? Tube – Covent Garden – Northern Line Book your journey

Camden Town

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Rich in colour and atmosphere Here you find the England eccentricity that one imagines. Punks, multicolored hair, unusual shops, combined with exotic bars and discos. Camden Town is a sea of entertainment. It overflows with a variety of colourful markets, shops, restaurants, bars, pubs, clubs, theatres and cinemas. The town attracts enormous crowds of Londoners and tourists alike. Watch the world go by from one of the terraces of the pubs and restaurants of Camden Lock Market, or try food from every corner of the world at the many street vendors. Useful Information Camden Town is famous for the four markets - Camden Market, Camden Lock Market, Camden Canal Market and Stables Market - all selling vintage clothing, street fashion, antiques and arts and crafts. Plenty of leatherwear and body piercing too. Extremely busy at weekends. For more information How to get there ? Tube – Camden Town – Northern Line Book your journey

Soho

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Full of life and energy! Soho has something for everyone. Set in the streets and alleyways between  Oxford Street, Shaftesbury Avenue, Charing Cross Road and Regent Street is one  of the most cosmopolitan parts of London. Visit the sophisticated boutiques of  Carnaby Street and Kingly Court by day and by night, cinemas, pubs, bars, nightclubs, comedy clubs, some superb live music venues and a dozen West Endtheatres attract people of all ages and backgrounds into Soho's melting pot. Useful Information From vintage treasure troves like Beyond Retro to high street heavyweights like Topshop, when it comes to shopping, Soho is as brilliant and bawdy as ever. Explore a wealth of indie boutiques and hipster record stores, iconic Carnaby Street, Berwick Street's in-your-face market and London's mock-Tudor masterpiece, Liberty. For more information How to get there ? Tube - Tottenham Court Road Book your journey

Usine Channel Outlet Store

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Your favourite brands at slashed prices At the Channel Outlet Store you can find your favourite brands at slashed prices throughout the year: each brand is committed to giving you a minimum 30% discount on the prices of its previous collections. You will also find samples, prototypes, seconds at even lower prices. The environment is very pleasing. Semi-circular in shape, this building has a very contemporary look and opens onto a vast landscaped park giving a feeling of peace and tranquillity. The Channel Outlet Store has something for the whole family! Throughout the year, discounted prices on all major brands will delight all the family: Adidas, Home&Cook, Zadig & Voltaire, Charles le Golf, Delsey, Lee Cooper, Tommy Hilfiger, Quiksilver etc. Eateries offering tasty snacks will help you "recharge your batteries" before carrying on hunting for bargains! You could even take French cakes back home. There is an open play area for children to let off steam between two fittings, or before buying those fashionable trainers you saw or a sweat shirt that Dad will love to wear! The Channel Outlet Store also caters for reduced mobility shoppers, of course: large aisles and ease of access will make your day really pleasurable. This is all about shopping at the best price! If you like branded products and fancy a new look, just treat yourself! If you are looking for a present, you can buy your friends the brand they like without breaking the bank! And... if you like French cooking, why not pay a visit to "Guy Degrenne" and offer your guests at home a true French experience! At certain times of the year, a sales area called "Entrepôt" (Warehouse) will offer you even more discounts! For further information, please see the Facebook page. Best go and see for yourself! Drive your car on board a Eurotunnel shuttle, the crossing will only take 35 minutes and the Channel Outlet Store is just behind our terminal! More ideas for shopping? Continue your shopping spree at nearby " Cité Europe"! More shops, restaurants, chocolatiers, pâtisseries, Carrefour hypermarket etc. Getting there and around As you leave the Eurotunnel le Shuttle terminal, follow the direction to the "Shopping Centre" on your right. The Outlet is just a little further up from the "Cité Europe" and to your right. Coming from the A16 motorway, take exit 41 and follow the signs to "Cité Europe". Parking: numerous covered and non covered parking spaces, all free of charge. For more information visit www.usinechanneloutletstore.com L'Usine Channel Outlet Store, Boulevard du Parc 62911 Coquelles, FRANCE Book your journey

German Christmas Markets

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Christmas shopping in Belgium and Germany The Christmas countdown starts as the decorations go up and the mince pies are gobbled down. If you're looking to spice up your celebrations this year, there are lots of interesting traditions and festivities to discover throughout Europe. Nowhere do they do Christmas more spectacularly than in Belgium and Germany, where atmospheric markets and streets filled with seasonal cheer are just waiting to be discovered. To add a bit of magic to your shopping expeditions, let Eurotunnel Le Shuttle introduce you to some of the top festive markets in Europe. Belgium The children of Belgium have two Christmas visitors each year, first on 6th December when St Nicholas is thought to bring presents, followed by Santa Claus on Christmas Day itself. There is fun to be found for all the family in Belgium, over the festive period, as different regions plan their celebrations and start to create their winter wonderlands. Brussels Right in the heart of Belgium, you can find one of its essential Christmas markets; the Plaisirs d'hiver, just two-and-a-half hour's drive from Eurotunnel Le Shuttle's Calais Terminal. Strolling amongst the twinkling lights of the Grand Palace and Place St. Catherine, you can browse hundreds of chalets, each dressed up as fairy tale gingerbread houses. In the glow of the city's beautiful historic buildings, you can pick up some unique gifts, from artisan products to fill up those stockings, to tasty local delicacies. If you visit Brussels' Winter Wonders you can even get involved in some outdoor fun including ice-skating, sledging and taking in panoramic views from the Ferris wheel. You can also step through the jaws of the Ice Monster; At 40 metres in length, this dinosaur made of ice is a hungry fellow, devouring thousands of visitors every year! Getting there Brussels is 2 hours from Calais following the A16 and E40 Bruges   If you're looking for something on a smaller scale, then it doesn't get much quainter than this. The Unesco World Heritage listed city of Bruges has intimate cobbled streets, medieval architecture, and picturesque bustling squares. Add to this an abundance of twinkling lights and impressive Christmas decorations and you've got one magical city. The main market activities take place in the Market Square, overlooked by the Belfry of Bruges, a medieval bell tower that dominates the city skyline. You can expect to see people gliding around the outdoor ice rink or warming up with a hot Belgium waffle or mulled wine. Getting there Bruges is 1 hour 20 minutes from Calais, taking the E40. Germany Escape modern Christmas commercialism with Germany's traditional markets, offering handcrafted quality gifts. Most German towns and cities have Christmas markets so there are plenty of festive shopping options, just a short drive over the Belgian border. Dusseldorf   Dusseldorf is in the north west of Germany just 434km, four hours and 40 minutes from Calais. What makes the Christmas market at Dusseldorf special is that it is held in six individual locations throughout the city. You can browse for handmade gifts at the little festive huts outside the town hall, or take the whole family for a free skate on the huge open-air ice rink at Gustaf-Gründgens-Platz. Schadowplatz is perfect for family fun with a merry-go-round and super-sized Santa Claus hats. Other highlights include the promenade along the Königsallee with big chestnut trees decorated in thousands of little lights, while Engelchenmarkt is the place to go for the hearty taste and smells of traditional German food. Rhine Tower   If you're all shopped out and looking to discover a quieter side to Dusseldorf, you could climb the Rhine Tower (Rheinturm) and see picture postcard views of the city and surrounding area from 240 metres up. The communications tower has an observation deck which is open to the public from 10am until late evening. Alternatively, take a walk along the tree-lined promenade here, following the mighty Rhine River and you'll find plenty of cafes to grab a spot of lunch. There's no need to worry about losing track of time in the evening; Horst H. Baumann's light sculpture on the side on the Rhine Tower pierces the dark to become the largest digital clock in the world. Siegburg If you're really looking for that alternative Christmas, then you should visit the Medieval Market in Siegburg, just outside of Bonn (438 km, four hours and 15 minutes from the Eurotunnel terminal at Calais, along the E40). On the first day of advent, the city takes a journey back in time with a festive medieval spectacle. Vendors dressed in period costume, jugglers and medieval artisans put up their tents and showcase their skills and wares. You'll be able to buy crafty gifts for your loved ones including baskets, clothing and wooden toys. The absence of electricity and artificial light adds to the dim medieval glow. Step back in time and give the whole family a Christmas to remember this year with a trip to Belgium or Germany. How to get there The magical festive markets in Belgium and Germany are all only a few hours' drive from Eurotunnel Le Shuttle's Calais Terminal. Book your journey

Lille Flea Market

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Lille's Annual Flea Market The Braderie - Millions of visitors descend in search of a bargain More than 100km of stalls for you to explore One man's junk is another man's treasure, or so the saying goes, and nowhere is this more evident than Lille's annual flea market, The Braderie. For one weekend every September France's fifth-largest city is closed to traffic completely as vendors of all trades and types line the streets with stalls. In a tradition reportedly dating back to medieval times, anybody can come to the city to buy or sell wares, and every year millions of visitors descend on the ancient streets in search of a bargain. Estimates suggest there are more than 100km of stalls for you to explore, which can prove a daunting prospect if you are unfamiliar with Lille and its winding medieval streets. This Eurotunnel le Shuttle guide will help you find the best the market has to offer and make the most of your weekend. For further information www.lilletourism.com Origins of the Braderie The definite history of The Braderie appears to have been lost in time, but popular local legend has it that the event originated when medieval aristocracy gave their serfs permission to sell their old clothes and unwanted possessions on the street. The story goes that the upper classes thought the event looked so much fun they eventually joined in and soon the flea market had become an established tradition. Today anybody is free to set up a stall, with the event become a sort of massive jumble sale rather than an organised market, though serious traders often reserve their pitches weeks in advance and the city hall has also begun offering reservations. There are no restrictions on what can be bought and sold (outside of the general legal ones of course) so expect items of all shapes and sizes. The Braderie has become particularly well known for its antiques, with items from across Europe on offer, ranging from war memorabilia to fine art. Getting there, parking and getting around Lille is a 109km (1hr 15min) drive from the Eurotunnel le Shuttle terminal in Calais. Take the A16 out of Calais, heading east, then take exit 57 towards Lille. From there the A25 will take you right to the edge of the city. City centre roads are all closed off for The Braderie, so it is best to park out of town and take public transport in. Just off the A25, on the way into the city, are Porte d'Arras, C.H.R. B-Calmette and Porte des Postes car parks, where you can pay for long stay supervised parking. Both are near Metro stations, so it's easy to leave your car and head off to explore the market. Alternative out-of-town car parks can be found north of the city in Lomme and east in Villeneuve d'Ascque. Where to shop The Braderie does not officially open until 3pm on the Saturday, so although you can browse some of the stalls in the morning it is often worth saving your energy until trading begins. In recent years critics have bemoaned the influx of more modern stalls selling cheap electronics and mass-produced items, but the smart shopper can avoid these lower-quality traders by exploring the smaller back roads and staying off the main boulevards. The city's metro is the fastest way around, though the streets around the exits will often get very crowded and exploring on foot gives you more opportunity to find a unique bargain or unexpected sights. Most of the market can be found between Gare Lille Flandres and Porte des Postes stations. If you're looking for antique furniture and other larger pieces head for the Façade de l'Esplanade, where you can hunt out a bargain while taking a stroll along Lille's ancient canal. This area is also popular with British antique dealers who make the journey to sell their wares for the weekend. The narrow streets of the old town, Vieux Lille, offer a friendly atmosphere, and are a great place to witness an impromptu performance by one of the many bands which liven up The Braderie every year. Inside the walls of the Citadelle de Lilleshoppers can find smaller antiques, such as books, jewellery and paintings. The opportunity to browse in such unique surroundings is not to be missed. Don't be put off asking about items if your French is not completely up to scratch – many traders speak English and you can often get a better deal with a bit of haggling. Food and Drink The north France weather can be extremely hot over the weekend, so make sure you have plenty of water to stay hydrated. Many of the locals will get in on the act, selling you cooling drinks from the windows of their houses. At The Braderie eating is a big business and the dish of the weekend is always mussels and frites. Restaurants display their popularity by having diners stack their empty mussel shells on the pavement outside, with an ongoing competition to see who can produce the biggest pile. This can lead to the market taking on a distinct seafood aroma by the second day. Other Attractions Before The Braderie begins organisers take advantage of the closed roads to hold a half-marathon through Lille on the Saturday. Throughout the weekend musicians can be found playing on nearly every street corner, so there is always some form of entertainment to enjoy, and because the event runs for a straight 33 hours visitors often party well into the night. For more ideas of thins to see and do check out our guide to Lille. Whether you are bargain hunting or just looking to soak up the atmosphere, The Braderie is a unique event that should not be missed.  Book your journey

Market days guide

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Now you can plan your shopping trips to France with this comprehensive guide to the markets in Nord-Pas de Calais. You know how it is - you're driving through a charming French town and see they're just packing up the market stalls. If only you'd known in advance you'd have got there earlier. Well now you can thanks to our comprehensive market guide. We give you the lowdown on over 50 markets in the Nord-Pas de Calais region, all within an easy drive of the Eurotunnel Le Shuttle Terminal. Most markets start at about 8-9 am and end at lunchtime - and with Eurotunnel Le Shuttle's 35 minute crossing, you get a head start. A French market really is a feast for the senses. Stalls laden with the freshest of vegetables: sun-ripened melons, giant red tomatoes, plump pink-tinged bulbs of garlic, shiny purple aubergines, piquant piles of black and green olives and all sorts of interesting salads. Farmers' wives selling a unique assortment of home-produced goodies - rich golden butter, home-made preserves, bunches of fresh herbs and baskets of goose eggs. There are stalls devoted to local cheeses - like Coeur d'Arras and Maroilles, plus pâtés and cold meats, tempting pastries, bread and tartes du pays, all perfect for a picnic. It's a good idea to bring a cool bag with you to keep your purchases fresh for the journey home. Many of the markets have much more to offer, too, from kitchen utensils and French provincial cookware to clothes, shoes and even carpets. While often the streets leading off the market place develop into intriguing flea markets where you can hunt happily for some unusual bargains. In summer, little villages on the coast, like Wissant, see their markets grow to 4 or 5 times their usual size when they offer all sorts of holiday extras like beach games and nautical clothing, not to mention the freshest fish plucked that morning from the nearby sea. And if you don't make it with the early birds - there's always the consolation that you'll scoop up some bargain fruit and vegetables as the market closes. So Happy Shopping! Market days in Nord-pas de Calais AIRE SUR LA LYS: Friday morning AMBLETEUSE: Wednesday morning ARDRES: Thursday morning AUCHEL: Tuesday morning ARRAS: Wednesday and Saturday morning - Grand Place ARQUES: Tuesday morning - Grand Place BAPAUME: Friday morning - Place Faidherbe BEAURAINVILLE: Wednesday morning BERCK SUR MER: Tuesday, Friday and Sunday morning - Place Claude Wilquin Wednesday and Saturday morning - Place de l'Eglise BETHUNE: Monday and Friday morning - Place Lamartine Wednesday and Saturday morning - Mont-Liebaut BOULOGNE SUR MER: Wednesday and Saturday morning - Place Dalton Sunday morning - Place Vignon et Quai Gambetta from May until October Fish market every morning Quai Gambetta BRUAY LA BUISSIERE: Sunday morning - Place Bodelot et Rue Raoul Briquet CALAIS: Wednesday and Saturday morning - Place d'Armes Thursday and Saturday - Place Crévecoeur Sunday morning - Beau-marais district CAMIERS: Monday morning CONDETTE: Sunday morning DESVRES: Tuesday morning ETAPLES SUR MER: Tuesday and Friday morning - Place du Général de Gaulle FAUQUEMBERGUES: Thursday morning FREVENT: Tuesaday morning - Place du marché à bestiaux FRUGES: Saturday morning GUINES: Friday morning HARDELOT: Sunday morning – from Easter to October every 2 weeks – July/August every Sunday HESDIN: Thursday morning HESDIGNEUL LES BETHUNE: 1st and 3rd Saturday of the month (Bio market from 4.00 to 6.00 pm) HOUDAIN: Thursday and Saturday morning HUCQUELIERS: Wednesday morning LE PORTEL PLAGE: Tuesday and Friday morning LE TOUQUET: June 1st to September 15th Monday, Thursday, Saturday morning - Place du marché couvert September 16th May 31st Thursday and Saturday morning - Place du marché couvert LENS: Tuesday and Friday morning - Place Roger Salengro Saturday afternoon - Grande Résidence LIEVIN: Wednesday morning LILLERS: Saturday morning - Place Roger Salengro et Place de l'Eglise LUMBRES: Friday morning - Grand Place MARQUISE: Thursday morning MERLIMONT: Monday and Friday in summer - Place de la gare MONTREUIL SUR MER: Saturday morning PAS EN ARTOIS: Tuesday morning – every 2 weeks SAMER: Monday morning - Grand Place Foch SAINTE-CECILE: Tuesday and Thursday morning - town centre - Esplanade de Sainte-Cécile - 15 june – 15 july SAINT-OMER: Wednesday morning - Place Perpignan Saturday morning - Place Foch SAINT-POL SUR TERNOISE: Monday morning STELLA PLAGE: Wednesday and Sunday - 15 Juneau 15 September THEROUANNE: Tuesday morning WIMEREUX: Tuesday and Friday morning WISSANT: Wednesday morning Book your journey

Shopping in Paris

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Paris, the perfect place for shopping. Paris is synonymous with shopping. With its high fashion, street chic, the finest foods and fine art antiques, you may want to take a spare suitcase when you visit, because there's no way you're leaving empty handed. Whether you're looking for a gift for the family or a whole new wardrobe, let Eurotunnel Le Shuttle help you find the shopping district which best suits you. Avenue Montaigne and Champs-Élysées The Champs-Élysées will be the first stop for many tourists looking to experience the shops of Paris. Running in one long glorious sweep from the Arc de Triomphe to the Place de la Concorde, the avenue is known in France as 'La plus belle avenue du monde' – 'the most beautiful avenue in the world'. However you feel about its looks, the Champs-Élysées offers a mixture of big brands and high quality. A special committee, formed 150 years ago, oversees the avenue and lobbies to keep unwanted shops out (in 2007 they successfully banned H&M from opening a branch there), meaning that retailers work hard to maintain the highest standards and give you the best possible shopping experience. At the east end of the Champs-Élysées turn off onto Avenue Montaigne for a more exclusive shopping experience with many of the big fashion labels. Here you can pick up exclusive clothing and jewellery while also acquiring a terrifying credit card bill, but then you are on holiday. BEST FOR: Big name shops – Adidas, Benetton, Disney Store, Nike, Zara, Cartier, Bel Air Fashion, Toyota, Gap, Sephora, Virgin Megastore, Dior, Chanel, Valentino, Ralph Lauren, Bulgari and more. PARKING: Parking Claridge, 60 Rue Ponthieu, €27 per day. Vinci Park Services, 18 Avenue Champs Elysées, €3.30 per hour. Q Park, 79 Avenue Marceau, €3.10 for one hour. Boulevard Haussmann This tree-lined avenue running from the 8th to the 9th Arrondissement is dominated by two of Paris's largest and oldest department stores; Galeries Lafayette and Au Printemps. Galeries Lafayette began as a haberdasher's in 1893 and today occupies three buildings on Boulevard Haussmann. The main building, Lafayette Coupole, is worth a visit for the grand architecture alone, standing ten storeys high and dominated by a magnificent glass dome. Once you've finished marvelling at your surrounding you can find anything from fashion, cosmetics and jewellery to books, music, and electronics. Just down the street Au Printemps offers similar architectural wonders, with a stunning stained glass cupola sheltering diners in the store's restaurant. Again, the shopping is spread across three buildings, with a variety of big name fashion brands, from Chanel to Calvin Klein, and home furnishings. BEST FOR: Everything you need in one place, clothes and home furnishing. PARKING: Vinci Park Gestion, 45 Boulevard Haussmann. Parc Stationnement, 164 Boulevard Haussmann. Haussmann Galeries Lafayette, junction of Rue Mogador and Boulevard Haussman. Le Marais The hip heart of Paris lies in Le Marais, a district spread across the 3rd and 4th arrondissements, populated with fashion boutiques, antique shops and cafes scattered amongst historic buildings and sights. The Rue des Francs-Bourgeois is one of the few places in Paris to ignore France's strict Sunday closing law, so is a perfect destination for the weekend visitor. The long road has numerous fashion boutiques crammed between magnificent traditional hotels. And when you're done shopping the Paris History Museum is just round the corner. More top fashion shops can be found on the Rue des Rosiers, the heart of the city's Jewish quarter. Here you will find a mixture of kosher boulangeries, charcuteries and restaurants mixed in with independent fashion boutiques. BEST FOR: Small boutiques, antique shops, putting the legwork in to find a bargain. PARKING: Parc Baudoyer, Place Baudoyer, €28 for one day. Vinci Park France, 48 Rue de l'hotel de ville. Hotel de Ville, 3 rue de la Tâcherie, €26 for one day. Les Halles and Rue de Rivoli If food is your thing then Les Halles is the district for you. Not only does the area boast the biggest indoor shopping mall in central Paris, but it also has a plethora of bakeries, fish stores, cheese shops, wine shops, produce stands and flower shops, many of which can be found on the Rue Montorgueil. The mall (Forum des Halles) has five floors, mostly underground, and a wide variety of shops and restaurants, from small boutiques to well known brands and even a cinema. The nearby Rue de Rivoli is another of Paris's most famous streets, though less exclusive than the Champs-Élysées. As well as leading tourists to some of the city's biggest museums (including The Louvre) Rue de Rivoli features shopping opportunities ranging in size from department stores to book stalls. BEST FOR: Food, shopping in bad weather. PARKING: Parking Rambuteau and Parking Berger, access from the tunnels of the rue des Halles, rue de Turbigo, the rue Coquillière or rue du Pont-Neuf, €15 for one day. Louvre-Tuileries and Faubourg Saint-Honoré Faubourg Saint-Honoré has been dubbed 'the most fashionable street in Europe' thanks to the presence of nearly every major fashion house in Europe. This is the perfect place to splash out on that exclusive outfit to be seen wearing in a chic Parisian nightspot. The surrounding area hosts the world-famous Louvre museum and Tuileries gardens and is host to numerous cafes where you can give sore shopped-out feet a break while enjoying the scenery. BEST FOR: Exclusive fashion – Lanvin, Hermès, Lancôme, Dalloyau, Dior, Roger Vivier, Vogue, Givenchy, Salvatore Ferragamo and more. PARKING: Parking du Carrousel, Avenue du Général Lemonnier. Getting there and around Paris is the perfect place to make some shopping! Just a few hours drive on the motorway from Eurotunnel's Calais Terminal. Book your journey

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